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The Kurt Rosenwinkel Forum » Tag: left hand - Recent Posts http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ The Kurt Rosenwinkel Forum » Tag: left hand - Recent Posts en Sat, 23 Jul 2016 15:01:53 +0000 laruenickelson on "Left hand technique, classical vs. rock" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/left-hand-technique-classical-vs-rock#post-11425
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Sat, 22 Jun 2013 17:09:30 +0000
laruenickelson 11425@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>I would say that what matters most is how your hand feels on the instrument. I played for years with both types of left hand technique. I played classical in High School and kept that for jazz but I played blues also in High School. Not too long ago a friend remarked the he thought I was a better blues/rock player than Jazz. After thinking about it I realized that when i play blues/rock the way of playing with my left hand felt more natural and while it inhibited certain things (Holdsworth type chords for example) it felt more natural ---which came out in the music. Of course everybody's hands are different so instead of worrying about it too much i would say find a way of playing that feels comfortable to you and not concern yourself too much with other school's of thought. </p>
arewolfe on "Left hand technique, classical vs. rock" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/left-hand-technique-classical-vs-rock#post-11421
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Fri, 21 Jun 2013 14:06:27 +0000
arewolfe 11421@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>I unintentionally developed my playing with a very high left hand thumb. It isn't always problematic, but I've had to recognize when a high thumb is potentially inhibiting (making more difficult than it needs to be) something I'm playing. Of course, I've seen KR play beautiful, fluid chordal passages with his entire thumb way over the top of the neck.</p> <p>Growing up I always put a lot of emphasis on using my pinky as often as possible to give it a work out. When I took lessons with Garrison Fewell he scolded me for using my pinky (on my fretting hand) too often, saying that I should use my ring finger whenever possible because it lends to a much warmer sound. It really changed my playing and made me take a step back from the whole "I have to make sure my pinky chops sky high" mentality that I was stuck in for over a decade. </p>
Basile865 on "Left hand technique, classical vs. rock" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/left-hand-technique-classical-vs-rock#post-11420
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Fri, 21 Jun 2013 12:53:48 +0000
Basile865 11420@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Theres no wrong and right way in my opinion. The only possible problem is if your technique or lack of technique is making you fall short of your goal. At that point you need to evaluate and modify.</p> <p>I think trying to realize your inner voice to its full potential is tough when looking through the lens of one instrument. If youre trying to find that, it helps experimenting with 2 or more instruments in my opinion. </p>
jkw on "Left hand technique, classical vs. rock" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/left-hand-technique-classical-vs-rock#post-11419
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Fri, 21 Jun 2013 06:09:14 +0000
jkw 11419@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Hi everyone,</p> <p>There is an interesting discussion about the position of left hand, fingering, and the way it moves on the neck, and how it influence your musicality as a guitarist. </p> <p>First I heard it from great Czech guitarist - David Doru┼╝ka, who told me, that changing the position of left hand from classical to more loose, with visible thumb, and using most of the time only 3 fingers (without 4th) influenced his phrasing and sound in positive way.<br /> At first it sounded strange to me, because I always looked on the instrument only as a medium of your inner voice, so how the way you play can affect your musicality? but more i think about it, the more i get confused.</p> <p>Basically, in jazz there are 2 groups of players, when we are talking about left hand technique:<br /> - classical trained players like Adam Rogers and Lage Lund<br /> - definitely bigger group of great guitarist like, Metheny, Scofield, Rosenwinkel, Bernstein, Moreno etc. etc. </p> <p>So what do you think, does it make any difference how you play with your left hand? Can it really influence your musicality? As you know, changing technique / position of hand is a lot work to do, is it worth it? </p>
Matt on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3085
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Mon, 25 Oct 2010 12:06:10 +0000
Matt 3085@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>i agree with that two step process. I didn&#39;t even think about facility, relaxation, etc until five years into my playing (and i also only knew very basic jazz theory, chords, etc). now, going back has really helped me. </p> <p>i feel like not focusing on technique in the beginning also helps the development of a relationship with the instrument. </p>
Anonymous on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3084
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Mon, 25 Oct 2010 12:01:18 +0000
Anonymous 3084@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>as far as effortlessness goes here is my experience-</p> <p>it seems that getting to the point of effortlessness is sort of a two step process. when you are learning new things on the guitar that your muscles arent strong enough for yet you have to exert strength over and over again until your muscles are strong enough to play whatever it is that you want to play. we all do this.</p> <p>the next step and the one that is forgotten sometimes is cutting out the physical exertion. because your muscles are now strong enough and your fingers know what to do you no longer have to exert muscle strength. it&#39;s already there! now it is time to relax and play effortlessly. </p> <p>i figured this out in a sort of roundabout way that i definitely don&#39;t encourage because there are better ways to get there. back in the day when i used to smoke pot (no longer) i would play the guitar. one day i was playing something that i had been working on and i realized it was really easy and there was no strain. i was relaxed and it was effortless! (i knew one day something useful would come out of smoking. ha!)</p> <p>any sort of relaxation or meditative practice will remind you what it feels like to be very relaxed and loose. sometimes we just don&#39;t realize how tense our muscles etc... are because we are like that all of the time. once you know and can remember what that body state is like then try to play the guitar while maintaining that relaxed state. try to notice the instant that your body starts to tense up when you are going for that run you are scared you are going to screw up and then stop and try it again but this time remembering what that relaxed feeling is. </p> <p>it&#39;s always a work in progress because this two part deal happens over and over again as you learn new things. i still have to remind myself to relax relax relax relax relax. unless im playing in my sludge metal band. i still havent figured out how to be relaxed while i play that music and im not sure if i should. ha! </p>
snowaltz on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3083
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Sun, 24 Oct 2010 23:22:00 +0000
snowaltz 3083@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Hey Jon,</p> <p>Alternate Picking v.s. Economy Picking:<br /> I practice both regularly, because my lines are typically rather jagged and change direction often. So, using only one technique will hinder my creativity. When practicing alternate picking I enjoy working with different subdivisions of the beat. I focus on 1:1 Quarter Notes, 2:1 Eighth Notes, 3:1 Triplets, 4:1 16th&#39;s, 5:1 Quintuplets, 6:1 16th Note Triplets, 7:1 Septuplets, and 8:1 32nd notes (obviously the metronome is set low!). This helps me really internalize the sound of the subdivision. When practicing economy picking, I use &quot;The Guitar Grimoire,&quot; by Adam Kadmon. This book focuses on 3NPS patterns. In my opinion, economy picking works really well with repeating shapes on the fret-board. </p> <p>I&#39;ll have to check more into the links you posted, to really have an opinion.</p> <p>The John McLaughlin DVD is a gold mine! Check it out if you get the chance. </p> <p>-James- </p>
silverwater on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3082
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Sun, 24 Oct 2010 22:28:18 +0000
silverwater 3082@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Hey James -</p> <p>Thanks for all that info, very informative. I&#39;m definitely gonna check out that McLaughlin DVD. I&#39;ve gone through pretty much every possible way to pick: palm on bridge, pinky leaning on pickguard, freehand, picking from the joint, picking from the elbow, picking from the forearm...but I think I&#39;ve settled on Johnny Mac&#39;s (and Monder&#39;s and Hekselman&#39;s and many others) way of picking mainly from the wrist, string-to-string movement from the elbow, and palm lightly muting unused strings. It seems like the most functional way. I&#39;ve never heard of Pepper Brown, but I&#39;m definitely going to check out his vids as well. I also didn&#39;t realize that Mick Goodrick talks about left hand technique in his book, I hadn&#39;t pulled that book out in ages, but it&#39;s a great exercise he has in there with regards to using energy in the most economical way, in both hands!!</p> <p>And I agree with you about checking out the shredders for tips on technique. I&#39;ve just started with John Pattuci&#39;s Vid, and I&#39;ve been working with Frank Gambale&#39;s books a little bit. Do you know Shaun Baxter&#39;s Guitar Gym? He&#39;s a shredder that constantly cites Paul Gilbert. If you haven&#39;t seen this, give me your email address. I&#39;ll send you the PDFs. You&#39;ll definitely like his legato workouts among other things. He&#39;s an advocate of Economy Picking, something I had never tried until a month ago. (I was a strict Alternate picker because of growing up on god damn Bill Leavitt books). What are your thoughts on Alternate vs. Economy picking? It seems that economy picking is great for triplets, sixteenth notes, and playing eighth notes uptempo, but I don&#39;t always like the articulation I get when playing medium tempo swing eighths. But I guess since they have different sounds, the only solution would be what Mick Goodrick would say: Learn how to do both.</p> <p>I found a couple things online recently that you may like as well:</p> <p><a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/24165811/R-Iznaola-Kitharologus" rel="nofollow">http://www.scribd.com/doc/24165811/R-Iznaola-Kitharologus</a></p> <p>Exercise 12 and 14 have been useful for me when focusing on left hand position and getting the fingers to move independently without pivoting off each other, minimizing the energy exerted to fret a note. I&#39;ve come up with a way to use Ex 12 to work on economy picking as well. One of the challenges coming from strict alternate picking is it&#39;s difficult to upstroke on the downbeats and downstroke on the upbeats. If you play each note in EX 12 twice, as 1/8 notes, and keep the strict rules in economy picking, you&#39;ll end up going down/up down/up down/up on the E string, then up/down up/down up/down on the B string...etc. etc. etc.</p> <p><a href="http://tinyurl.com/33a2tcu" rel="nofollow">http://tinyurl.com/33a2tcu</a></p> <p>Wow that&#39;s quite a link, but it&#39;s for an online version of &quot;The Natural Classical Guitar: The Principles of Effortless Playing&quot; by Lee Ryan. I just found this one two days ago. It&#39;s focuses more on mental techniques than physical. I haven&#39;t finished reading it yet, but there&#39;s some great stuff in there about concentration, and how to not use more energy than necessary, two things that I desperately need improvement with. </p> <p>Long post, but hey it&#39;s a worthy subject.</p> <p>Cheers,<br /> Jon </p>
snowaltz on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3081
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Sun, 24 Oct 2010 19:27:24 +0000
snowaltz 3081@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Hi Silverwater,</p> <p>The topic of technique (right or left hand) is very interesting to me. I have spent a lot of time searching for instructional material and also coming up with my own solutions to problems similar to your tape on the fingers. </p> <p>Here are a couple of published materials that you may find interesting: John McLaughlins&#39; DVD &quot;This is the Way I Do It,&quot; (close-up shots of both his left and right hand) Mick Goodrick&#39;s book &quot;The Advancing Guitarist,&quot; (the everything book, has an article on proper left hand finger pressure) Pebber Brown&#39;s Youtube Videos (anything by this guy is cool, he has an enormous amount of material posted) also, if you are willing - check out the following guitarists: John Petrucci, Steve Vai, Frank Gambale, Paul Gilbert, Shawn Lane, Rusty Cooley, etc. There is a lot we &quot;jazzers&quot; can learn from rock guys. They spend a huge amount of time on technique. You can find short instructional clips on youtube as well as many blogs. </p> <p>Here is my own suggestion for improving left hand technique:<br /> I work on doing trill exercises (rapid hammer-ons and pull-offs) using all of the finger combinations of the left hand 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4, 1-2-3, 2-3-4, 1-2-4, 1-3-4, and 1-2-3-4. Try and isolate the finger groups that are the weakest. Also, remember to do this on all strings and different positions to get the most out of the workout. </p> <p>I sincerely hope this has been informative. </p> <p>All the best,<br /> James </p>
silverwater on "Effortless Left-Hand Technique" http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/topic/effortless-left-hand-technique#post-3080
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Sun, 24 Oct 2010 17:26:35 +0000
silverwater 3080@http://www.kurtrosenwinkel.com/forum/ <p>Hey all,</p> <p>I&#39;ve been doing a lot of overhauling of my technique lately (a scary thing to do after 14 years of playing). I had been focused mainly on the right-hand, but after seeing Ben Monder last month I&#39;ve been thinking a lot about how to get my left hand to play more effortlessly (not surprising after one sees Monder!). I had always thought I had good left hand technique with the thumb well behind the neck like all my teachers told me, but there was too much tension in my left hand because this led to me constantly &quot;pinching&quot; the guitar, and for the past few years my hand got very weak after only a few hours of playing.</p> <p>So here are a few things I&#39;ve done that have helped:</p> <p>1. Shifted my position so the tip of the thumb is visible from behind the neck.</p> <p>2. Played with a piece of tape around my 4 fretting fingers, above the knuckle and just below the first bend in the fingers. It&#39;s totally weird feeling and not exactly how one would play for real, but it&#39;s taught me how keep my fingers closer to the fretboard, and to get around the neck without pivoting off my thumb.</p> <p>3. Trying to get the fingers to work independently, meaning the force that applies pressure to the string comes from that finger alone, and not from leaning or pivoting off another finger.</p> <p>So anyways, I&#39;d like to hear what other people have learned about this subject, or if someone can point out some good books/videos that hit on this topic that would be great too. I&#39;d especially like to hear if someone has heard Ben Monder talk about how he developed his left hand technique! </p>