Magical rainbow ponies

Adding effects to my setup. Got alot of questions.

(6 posts)

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  1. adamv
    Member

    I just got into adding some effects to my setup and want to make sure i get the best sound out of what I am working with. My question is: Do you set your amp settings first and then adjust the pedals accordingly or the other way around or do you set the amp kind of flat and then add effects? Also do you guys get the knobs on your guitar dialed in before the amp is setup or wait until the amp and pedals are dialed in to do that? I hope the questions aren't to confusing. I've been playing straight into the amp since I started playing and all this stuff is really new to me. Thanks in advance guys. I love this forum and everyone on it.

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  2. adamv
    Member

    Sorry one more. In what order do you set the pedals? going down the effects chain? what is the order of the effects chain anyways? sorry i guess a couple more. I'm just really confused and terrible when it comes to these kinds of things. Then my OCD kicks in and i just can't stop thinking i'm doing everything wrong.

  3. jbroad
    Member

  4. smoke
    Member

    Do you set your amp settings first and then adjust the pedals accordingly or the other way around or do you set the amp kind of flat and then add effects?

    I set my basic amp tone, which is an older Pro Reverb, like I like it - good, punchy clean tone with reverb. I play a strat so there can be quite a difference in tone between the pickups. I will try to hit a middle ground between the tone of all of the pickup positions since I shift around a lot.

    I run everything into the front of the amp which includes wah, volume pedal, two overdrives, tremolo, delay, and looper. I have delay on at all times so I spent a lot of time dialing it in to where it adds 'depth' but doesn't blur single note lines.

    I also generally run one overdrive on all the time and will set the eq flat, the volume up a little higher than unity, and the drive down. It just adds sustain to the basic tone and a little grit.

    I'll then set the 2nd overdrive to be a more distorted lead tone. Depending on how much gain I need, I will either set it on its own or set it to stack with the 1st overdrive.

    The tremolo is two knobs so I set it as needed, usually on the fly. The looper is also always ready to go and is easily adjustable if need be.

    The kicker is all of this is subject to change depending on the place I am playing, the musicians I am playing with, and the music I am playing. Nothing is set in stone, but I have a good baseline for everything after playing with the same rig for a while. Play enough with the same rig and you get to know it pretty well.

    Just spend a few hours playing with knobs. Start with a base tone and build from there. Add one effect at a time and just have fun. It can be helpful to keep a little scrap paper handy to jot down settings.

  5. smoke
    Member

    Then my OCD kicks in and i just can't stop thinking i'm doing everything wrong.

    Something worth mentioning is there is no 'wrong'. Tone is subjective and there are far too many great tones from all kinds of rigs - big Marshall stacks, small practice amps, single coils , humbuckers, fuzz, clean, dry, reverb, delay, cheap gear, expensive gear, etc.

    Whatever sounds good to you is good.

  6. senggedorje
    Member

    [quote]Whatever sounds good to you is good.

    I would really echo this as well. You really have to listen carefully yet try to not waste too much time fiddling with "tone." Play with your pedals and see what sounds right to you. There are "rules," such as wah- overdrive/distortion/fuzz-chorus/phasers/flangers-delays-loopers, but players break these rules all the time and sound great. What I really try to pay attention to is the effect a pedal has on the my sound when it's turned off. Some pedals, especially delay pedals, can add some a lot of noise to your signal.

    As I implied with the first sentence above, playing is more important than spending endless hours on "tone," which as others have mentioned, is quite subjective.


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