Gilad Hekselman gear, interviews, anything??

(60 posts)

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  1. jazzacast55
    Member

    I'm a big fan of Gilads playing and love his tone, anyone know what pedals, amps etc.. he's using live?
    I can't find any interviews or much info on him talking about his gear or anything for that matter which is a real shame.
    Would love to know if anyone has been to any workshops (if he's had any) and heard about him talk about playing music or anything.
    Big ask but I've been reading posts from this forum for a while now and it seems like you guys are great for giving info on any great modern jazz guitarists.

    Thanks

  2. Sandemose
    Member

    Yeah, this is the place for music and musicians, as much as about Kurt. Ive heard about lots of great guitarists through this forum (and the old one), esp. Lage Lund, Mike Moreno and Kreisberg. Either way, Ive aslo been searching for info on Gilad as well. Cant find much at all. Hope anyone can bring some info in on this one. Gilad is one of my absolute favs right now. But to be honest after watching Kreisbergs sologuitar performance some weeks ago, I think he is one of the sickest cats Ive ever heard. Didnt really think that was possible. Sorry, of topic, back to Gilad.

    Best, Sandemose

  3. jazzacast55
    Member

    Oh yeah, I love Kreisberg, I had a lesson with him earlier in the year, amazing guy still one of my favourites, as well as the others you mentioned, would of loved to see the solo guitar gig, that must have been great.
    But yeah back to Gilad, I thought a few guys on this forum may have seen him live and checked out what gear he was using, I don't think he is teaching at the new school but I though he must have held some workshop master class things at some stage, I love his couple of albums and anything with him and Ari Hoenig on youtube is amazing, they have something special going on, I love the vid of them playing the painter!

  4. a good friend of mine plays a lot of gigs with Gilad(drummer Aaron Mcclendon). I'll see if he has some info. Gilad is a great player!

  5. Well, I was lucky enough to take a lesson last year with Gilad, and I couldn't afford to bring my own guitar, so I got to play his. It's an old Gibson Howard Roberts model, and it plays and sounds beautifully. I'm pretty sure we used a Deluxe Reverb, although I could be wrong about that...anyways that lesson was pretty incredible, especially for being only an hour.

  6. Benny
    Member

    Brandon beat me to it! Gibson Howard Roberts in all the videos I've seen. I actually just googled "Gilad Hekselmen gear" and it brought up a rider for the Qilad Hekselmen Quartet. Specifies (in order of preference): Fender Twin Reverb, Twin Reverb II, Twin Amp, Concert, Deluxe Reverb.

  7. jazzacast55
    Member

    Awesome guys!, Brandon, would love for some basic info or ideas that Gilad discussed in the lesson, maybe things he suggested to work on or the way he thinks about things?
    Also at the begining of this video you can kind of see some of his live gear:

    [+] Embed the video | Video DownloadGet the Video Plugin

    Looks like a holy grail reverb, boss delay and maybe a t.c electronics pedal? plus a couple others it looks like, would love to know if anyone could confirm his live pedal setup.

  8. Yeah! I'll divulge a few things of interest. Basically, we picked a tune ("All The Things You Are") and I played it for him, unaccompanied. I played melody, melody/chords, and a few choruses of blowing. We talked about phrasing melodies like vocalists, and some metronome tricks to get some interesting metric things going on. I was really grateful for all this, because I felt my unaccompanied playing was a little too much like my playing with a group. It really helped me to relax and have an equal creative flow while playing solo. We also talked about linear playing (i.e., not on the changes, but more in a method like Paul Bley), and we also did a really, super cool melodic exercise that I'm not sure I should divulge its details unless I get his permission. It seemed like a pretty personal exercise, and I think if anyone was to learn it, they should learn it from him. I'll send him a Facebook message or something, and see if he minds if I post it. Anyways, taking lessons from him was definitely a great experience, and if I was anywhere near the NY area, I would try to do it regularly. To be such a young player, he has an old, wise soul and a deep passion for his music and practice.

  9. jazznan
    Member

    cool

  10. jazzacast55
    Member

    Awesome, that sounds amazing, I'm not totally sure what you mean about the linear playing in a method like Paul Bley as I'm not to familliar with his playing but it must of been amazing, would love to know more about the metronome tricks but I understand that it was between Gilad and yourself so thats fine.
    I'm really interested in anything advice Gilad has, really wish he had some interviews or lessons on his website.
    By the way just listening to Anat Cohens album Notes from the Village as I write this, Gilad plays on a few of the tracks, Very cool stuff, great album also, evryone should check it out, amazing tunes!

    Thanks for sharing

  11. Well, I just felt like the exercise he showed me was something really deep, and I don't feel as though I could do it justice by explaining it on here. It would best be learned from Gilad, or someone else who knows the exercise.

    The linear approach is more along the lines of creating a melodic line that flows in an orderly fashion, though not necessarily "on the changes". It's a much different ay of playing "out" than by substitutions or side-slipping, etc. Much more organic.

    The metronome tricks were pretty cool. I think I've seen some of them on here before, like putting the click on different parts of the beat, so you command the actual beat. Also, making the click the super-triplet, a 5-over-4, etc. Also very useful was playing with the metronome light only (no sound) and closing your eyes, playing 4 bars, opening your eyes and seeing how close you are to the met. Pretty challenging once you extend the phrases.

  12. jazzacast55
    Member

    Hey mate, some really cool info there can't thank you enough for sharing, I'm not to sure if I'll get a chance to have a lesson with Gilad unless he offers over skype but from what you have mentioned it seems there is lots to be learned from him!
    Still a little curious about the "super cool melodic exercise" you mentioned but hey it was your lesson, if you get permission from Gilad I don't think you should feel like your not doing it justice by tring to explain it, seeing as not many people know what it is.
    Oh and a guitar nerd question, any idea of what type of gear he uses in the way of pedals live?

  13. hey i picked up jazz guitar like 3 years ago. i took some privates but never music classes. i learned most of what i know through friends, books, and YOUTUBE!!!!!!!!!. i heard about gilad when i was learning how to play prelude to a kiss. i saw his vid on youtube and found out that he plays with ari hoening. i live near the city so i saw him live a couple of times... i just want to say that i consider myself a beginner. i wasnt a music student during highschool or college. i have a lot to learn. anyway, even though i thought that it might be a waste of gilads time to give me a lesson, i built enough courage to ask him at the end of his set one monday night. i told him that i was a beginner but he was willing to meet with me. i had a lesson in december and recorded it. im actually listening to it again right now. basically, the main thing he was trying to say was that if i have enough curiosity to learn anything about jazz, i should be able to use my creativity to build my own "school." he talked a bit about how to practice, build exercises, make ur own sound, bebop lines, phrasing, and drop 2 voicings. i talked about how i needed some sort of practice routine. we first talked about warming up. i told him i play scales in thirds stuff like that. he said warming up for him is simply clearing his mind and focusing what needs to get done. for phrasing, i played a phrase over a ii v i using chromatics and approach notes. he said theres countless ways to play a similar sound phrase by either making the notes go up or down. overall, the lesson really made me realize i simply have to put more focus into WHAT I WANT OUT OF JAZZ. for example, if i want to work on my phrasing, i have to transcribe. its that simple. if i want answers about jazz harmony, i should buy a book and study it for hours and hours. its that simple. i feel like a player like him just DOES IT. i think gilad knows what he wants and he works hard to strive for it. for example, when i asked him about what he did to develop his sound, all he said was i wanted this sound so i tried holding my pick this way and i tried placing my pick closer to the bridge etc etc. he just tried a bunch of things until he felt satisfied. hope this makes sense. i dont feel like checking for spelling or grammatical mistakes.

  14. Matt
    Member

    Yeah, i'd say that that approach is definitely worthwhile.

    also, Brandon, i saw you perform with the Intercollegiate Jazz Band last year (i was in allstate) and i really enjoyed your playing! your website tunes sound great as well.

  15. Sandemose
    Member

    piggyfly0000: awesome post dude. This is what jazz is all about: sharing. Thanks alot! Its so cool that the answers are so simple. Build your internal sense, dream of music and make it real. Go for the dream...

    Best, Sandemose

  16. jazzacast55
    Member

    Awesome piggyfly0000! Thanks so much for sharing I love hearing about theses lessons the a few of you have had with Gilad!
    I would love to hear the lesson, I have a lesson with Jonathan Kreisberg that I recorded, would love to swap if you are interested!


  17. Sandemose
    Member

    Man, one lesson with Gilad and Kreisberg...you make freaking drool over here...

    Best, Sandemose

  18. jazzacast55
    Member

    ok nice, If I can work out how to send it to you that would be great!
    I'll gett back to you

  19. Sandemose
    Member

    I have (and most other people here on the forum I guess) a Lage Lund lesson someone here shared. I dont know how sensitive sharing all this stuff is? I would def. go for a real lesson with Kreisberg, even though I could listen to recorded lesson with him as well. Meeting the person must be the real deal, compared to listening to a lesson with someone else. Still, it would be awesome if the lessons would be available to members of this forum, but not if its not okey with Jesus Kreistberg, or Gilad.

    ACT, or Kurt, you have any opinions about this? I mean sharing stuff, that is not related to Kurt here?

    Best, Sandemose

  20. JorgeRubiales
    Member

    I suppose that as far as it doesn't infring any copyright law and doesn't go against the wishes of the masters (Gilad, Kreistberg, et al.) it wouldn't be any problem. I think the right thing to do is to email the person who gives the masterclass and ask for permission.

  21. Matt
    Member

  22. Haim
    Member

  23. Sandemose
    Member

    May I burn in HELL if this is wrong. I remember Tim posting here on the forum, saying its okey to share the lesson here. He didnt know about Lage, but he thought that he would be cool with it.

    Lage Lund, if you dont approve with this, may my strings break everyday for the rest of my life.

    http://www.megaupload.com/?d=GRTA0D6E

    Best, Sandemose

  24. ericost
    Member


  25. Matt
    Member

    I'm sure most people who have the boot of a lesson have no problem buying Lage's cds and seeing his shows - much financial payback.

  26. jazznan
    Member


  27. ericost
    Member


  28. i think everyone should take a chill pill. its so tensed in here. just listen to

    [+] Embed the video | Video DownloadGet the Video Plugin
    and KEWLAXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX.


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