Neck exercises.

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  1. Quintricacy
    Member

    So after listening to Kurt's clinic from 2006 (thanks Sandemose!) I was wondering does anyone know of any books that deal with complete neck exercises for scales and arpeggios. This is definitely one of my weaknesses. I tend to gravitate towards familiar positions all the time for every chord or certain types of shapes. Especially for most chords in melodic minor.

    Magical rainbow ponies
  2. Colonel Trane
    Member

    I don't know of any books but the ones Kurt uses in that clinic are excellent. I even take it a little further playing different intervals and arpeggios through artificial key changes like that. Also try taking scales 4 notes per string across the entire neck of the guitar starting on your lowest note and ending on your highest note then going backwards.

  3. JtV
    Member

    This sounds interesting. Colonel Trane could you give a more specific example. I like to hear what people are doing in regards to practicing.

    Thanks

  4. Colonel Trane
    Member

    In regards to the four note per string one lets say I'm working with a major scale in C. I start with the open low E since that's the lowest note available in the key and play E F G A on the low E string, then go to A and play B C D E and then down to the D string and so on until I hit the highest note available in the given key, in this case it would be D on the 22nd fret of the high E string. Then I go backwards and repeat this through all keys. The Kurt one involves dividing all 12 keys into 4 subgroups based on the Coltrane system of major 3rds. Kind of like Kurt's Cubism. Anyway so say your groups are C E Ab C# F A D F# Bb and Eb G B, (I know theirs no consistency of flats and sharps there but you get the picture) So I'll start with a C major scale and play the first 4 notes C D E F now my key center is going to shift to E so I play the closest note in E major then continue the pattern so it would go F# Ab A B now I'm in Ab major and so on until you've gone through each key. I also will do this with all types of scales besides major and with intervals and arpeggios just thinking diatonically in each key center. I also will switch around the pattern so maybe it would go A F C# F# D Bb B Eb G Ab C E just so that it's always a fresh thing to help my mind see any type of shift in key as rapidly as possible. I hope that made sense......

  5. cruxtable
    Member

    i prefer a bit of a less structured approach... i usually work out any fretboard weaknesses when i just sit down and improvise, noodle around with scales and arpeggios, try to follow my ears and fix anything that isn't working in my fingers..take scales and arpeggios up and down, using different string sets and combinations...just try sitting down and doing it! make it musical!

  6. Sandemose
    Member

    This topic is so hard. I used to spend alot of time practicing different stuff, trying to investigate all possibilities and so on. I didnt get better at all. I developed a decent tone and touch, but not really musically. From now on, I only work with tunes, and if I work with scales, Im more into finding new sounds and ways to applicate those on the tunes I currently work on. I work hard with triads, their inversions and combining different bass notes. I also work hard on my hybrid picking. Its an techniqal aspect that have been totally neglected for me. Its an amazing tool, and I find new sound possibilities Ive never thought of. Ben Monder of course is a big inspiration (on all levels), but his right hand is "the Thing". Same with Tim Miller, but also Gilad Hekselman and Lage Lund, and Mike Moreno (!) have great right hands. I love playing chords through keys with one open string using hybrid picking. Like in E lydian (B major):

    --2----4-----6-----7-----9-----11----12-----
    --0----0-----0-----0-----0-----0------0-------
    --3----4-----6-----8-----9-----11----13------
    --1----2-----4-----6-----8-----9-----11------
    --------------------------------------------------
    --------------------------------------------------

    Good topic, even if its hard, and I tend to talk more about practicing than practing myself ;)

    Best,

    Sandemose

  7. animitta
    Member

    In regards to usefull way to practice scale:
    I had the lucky to be a Jon Damian's student during 3 summer master classes to whom i have participated and i remember a really usefull study that Jon gave to us. He called that the Zorro's scale, i think you will soon understand why : )

    This is the exercise from Jon's words:

    You pick one scale ( F Major in this example ) and move along one string at time. When moving to a next higher or lower position use an efficient fingering. Generally 3 notes per position. When moving to a higher position shift to the first or sometimes 2nd finger from finger 3 or 4. When shifting to a lower position shift to finger 3 or 4 from finger 1 or 2. There are many possiilities.

    Zorro Scale F Major

    (Fingering)

    1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 4 2 1 4 2 1 4
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    B|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    A|---------------------|---------------------|------15---13---12---|-10---8----7----5----|
    E|-1----3----5----6----|-8----10---12---13---|-15------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    2 1 0 0 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 4 3 1

    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    B|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|------15---14---12---|
    D|----------------0----|-2----3----5----7----|-8----10---12---14---|-15------------------|
    A|-3----1----0---------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    4 3 1 4 2 1 0 1 3 1 2 4 1 2 4 4

    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|----------------13---|
    B|---------------------|----------------1----|-3----5----6----8----|-10---11---13--------|
    G|-10---9----7----5----|-3----2----0---------|---------------------|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    A|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    3 1 4 2 1 3 1 0 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2

    E|-12---10---8----6----|-5----3----1----0----|-1----3----5----6----|-8----10---12---13---|
    B|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    A|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    4 4 2 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 0 1 2 4 1 3

    E|-15------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    B|------15---13---11---|-10---8----6----5----|-3----1--------------|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|---------------------|-----------0----2----|-3----5----7----9----|
    D|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    A|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    4 1 3 4 4 3 1 4 2 1 4 2 1 0 0 1

    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    B|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    G|-10---12---14---15---|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|-15---14---12---10---|-8----7----5----3----|-2----0--------------|
    A|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|-----------0----1----|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|

    (Fingering)

    2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 4 2 1 4 2 1 4 2

    E|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    B|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|---------------------|
    A|-3----5----7----8----|-10---12---13---15---|---------------------|---------------------|
    E|---------------------|---------------------|-15---13---12---10---|-8----6----5----3----|

    (Fingering)

    1 0

    E|---------------------|
    B|---------------------|
    G|---------------------|
    D|---------------------|
    A|---------------------|
    E|-1----0--------------|

    You can use this concept on other scale, Melodic Minor, Pentonic and so on.

    Last but not least i will definitely raccomend the Jon Damian's books, not only for scale but for many many usefull things and inspiration:

    The Guitarist's Guide to Composing and Improvising
    The chord Factory

    Hope it helps.

    All the Best
    Animitta

    P.S Unluckily the tab is not clear but i can pubblish a pdf file or guitar pro one if someone is interested.

  8. Colonel Trane
    Member

    I think you guys bring up a good point with the tunes and I do the same thing. I spend much more time improvising and playing through tunes than I do running scales and other excersizes. Animitta I see what your saying with that and you are lucky to have been able to study with Jon. I hope to be able to do that soon.



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