Question for Kurt - Learning

(16 posts)
  1. filters
    Member

    Hi Kurt,

    Since you mentionned wanting to "reboot" this forum, I wanted to ask you a few questions.
    Recently I've been reading a book by Tim Ferriss called The 4 hour chef, it's a book about... cooking, well, it's also about learning. Basically the main idea is that 20% of anything produces 80% of the results. I'm about to have one month off and wanted to brush up my playing, improve, get better. In this book the author talks about deconstructing a subject and asking a master.
    Here are a few questions - that would be extremely cool if you could answer those and would help a lot of players too.

    1- What are the biggest mistakes and myths you see in jazz guitar training ? What are the biggest wastes of time ?

    2- If you were to train me for four weeks and let's say we are going to focus on just getting better at negotiating playing over changes (traditional, or not traditional, doesn't matter) and we also had 24 hours a day to do so, what would the training look like?

    3- If you could practice just one thing to get better, what would it be?

    Thanks a lot !

  2. fakejake
    Member

    Great questions, I'd love to hear Kurt's answer!

    Email
  3. Alvin
    Member

    Nice questions! :)

  4. patfarlow
    Member

    bueller

    bueller...

  5. Voodoo economics...

  6. kurtisrosenwinkel
    Administrator

    hey all I actually wrote a reply to this a few days ago but the site crashed and i lost it. here goes again:

    1- What are the biggest mistakes and myths you see in jazz guitar training ? What are the biggest wastes of time ?

    I think the biggest mistake that students make is to not actually listen to the sound they are making, the sound coming out of the amplifier and to the sound of the other musicians they are playing with. Many younger cats trying to grow are so focused on the fretboard or the changes in their mind that they forget to make music and then the music isnt happening and they get depressed and think that they aren't good and have to study more and get deeper into the same cycle.

    2- If you were to train me for four weeks and let's say we are going to focus on just getting better at negotiating playing over changes (traditional, or not traditional, doesn't matter) and we also had 24 hours a day to do so, what would the training look like?

    learn the scales of the chords, practice improvising melodies all over the neck on one chord, then another and another. then start to move through progressions and study which notes change and which ones stay the same. take tunes. analyze them, look for passing chords and substitutions and focus on voice leading and making chord melodies. write down random chord sequences, make a midi demo of the progression or jam with a friend and take turns making melodies. think of it as making melodies- not "soloing"...

    3- If you could practice just one thing to get better, what would it be?

    self discipline.

  7. smoke
    Member

    Thank you for the answers Kurt. I appreciate you taking the time to help us out!

    Speaking of writing random changes and making a midi demo, I'll toss in a plug for a DAW called Ignite by Air Music Tech. It is free and is super easy to use for making midi loops for practicing. It will do odd times and has nice sounding virtual instruments. I do the exact thing you mentioned with Ignite and have found it really useful for discovering areas of the fretboard where I am weak.

    I won't link to it in case that violates the rules but you can google it. No affiliation whatsoever. Just had it as a free download when I bought my midi keyboard and got tired of grappling with Ableton.

  8. filters
    Member

    Thanks a lot Kurt. That was very helpful. I'm still figuring out what does "make music" mean, well maybe I'm overthinking it but maybe what's lacking is not involving our emotional side in the practice room. In the end most students (myself included) think that practicing certain scales and licks will make interesting statements. That's just not enough.

    Anyway still digesting your answers. Thanks so much.

  9. clebergf
    Member

    Thank's for the answer Kurt!!!

  10. jazznan
    Member

    This is just great Kurt, stuff we're all looking for-mentorship and advice from a master, now the hard work!

    I've never really dug into chord scales like I should, so Kurt, do you or anyone else have a good source for studying chord/scales? Thanks

  11. kurtisrosenwinkel
    Administrator

    Adelhard Roidinger: "Jazz Improvisation and Pentatonic"

  12. mjkl
    Member

    My German isn't up to much, but page 54 onwards of this paper seems to discuss this pentatonic approach.

    http://www.geocities.ws/cleklee/downloads/music/fba-cl.pdf

    All the best,
    Mark

  13. smoke
    Member

    Kurt has mentioned that pentatonic book in the past but I've never been able to find it here in the US. Maybe it is more available overseas? I'd love to check it out. Anyone ever found a copy?

  14. bingefeller
    Member

    smoke I can't find that book and I think it's out of print. Probably a second hand book shop or eBay would be your best bet. I couldnt' find a copy on the UK amazon.

  15. jazznan
    Member

    Thanks again Kurt for your time and advice!

  16. Gesture
    Member

    I just started with Pentatonic Khancepts from Steve Khan. It seems like a really accessible and practical book to introduce a variety of pentatonic ideas in jazz guitar playing. (I also recommend his other book on chords)

    And another question for Kurt (or anyone else if they feel the need to provide me with an answer:))

    I'm doing audition at several music schools in Holland & maybe Germany this summer and I wonder if you have any advice for preparing? Since you teach in Berlin i'm kind of keen to know what you think are the most important skills a guitar player should have to be accepted at a music school. I'm sure it varies a lot but maybe you could give your overall view on this subject. Thanks in advance!!


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