Twin Reverb vs Deluxe Reverb

(20 posts)
  1. LeonardoB
    Member

    Hi guys, I'm relatively new on the Jazz scene and tried to figure out what amp to buy to match a Epiphone Sheraton II. The choice has limited to two Fender amps: the Twin Reverb and the Deluxe Reverb. Tried the Deluxe personally, and made up my mind by checking my favourite player's setup like Rosenwinkel, Kreisberg, Hekselman, Rogers, Monder.
    The TR has more clean room, and a higher wattage, I know Kurt uses it in gigs and has used it in recording some trio things like Reflections (I think). But it might be too loud, heavy and thus difficult to move for gigs.
    Instead, the DR is smaller, 22 watt and easier to move around; it gets dirty way before than the Twin, though, so I was wondering if I might be forced to crank up the knob because I need volume and hence be forced to dirt my sound even if I don't want to.

    Please guys, I rely on you to give me your opinion and list the PROs and CONs of each amp of the two.

  2. Gia5
    Member

    I guess it depends by some circumstances, for example, what are the places you play most? Large avenues, small or regular clubs, large rooms??
    I own a deluxe reverb and i am happy with it. Easy to carry, in clubs i never had to use it at more than 5 knob level, and it wasn't dirt. I even saw players use it at festivals, with a mic of course...you only need the volume YOU need to hear on the stage, for the audience, some technician will take care.
    when i play in larger venues usually i don't need to bring my amp, service guys will always let you find a twin in there...

  3. gleepglop
    Member

    Like Gia5 said, larger venues will usually have a twin, or you can mike the amp. I use a DR and like the sound, it rarely needs to get cranked to the point of distortion.

  4. Basile865
    Member

    The obvious con with the Twin is the weight - when hauling mine around for a few weeks after buying it, the first thing it really needed was casters. I think the Deluxe Reverb is a strong amp but it doesn't have the same soundstage (if thats the correct term) as the Twin Reverb. You can run them side by side around the same level and the twin just sounds larger to my ears - mainly due to 2x12's. I really prefer the Twin because I can get a fuller sound. But then again if you're running around gigging in a city - and having to haul your own amp - the obvious choice is a deluxe reverb. I use my twin for gigs and at a church I play at. I just like having the power and headroom - it keeps tight in the low end as well.

    Ultimately you'll know what amp fits your needs the best. Just depends on the gig size/type and if you don't mind hauling a heavy combo amp. To me the sound and power I have backing me is worth the little extra hassle moving it. The deluxe reverb definitely has enough power to play any venue with the way PA systems are these days - but theres something about feeling more power of an amp and having it become a more cohesive unit with the guitar. Theres nothing I hate more then having to keep the amp level really low and just using the monitor. Its a different playing experience all together. Thats just my 2 cents anyway. Good luck - you can't really go wrong with either amp they're both great amps!

  5. jorgemg1984
    Member

    The Deluxe Reverb doesnt have a Medium control, this is a huge limation on that amp! Saying this I never needed the power of the twin in a jazz context, when I play in big venues I always have a PA for the audience and monitor on stage. The Twin Kurt uses is modified, he uses regular Twins on the Road but with EQ pedals, stock Twins are very bright usually (as are Deluxes or most Fenders) for jazz. And the weight is unbearable... Check other options!

    Private
  6. mrzzajjazz
    Member

    I recently bought a fender twin myself, and am really pleased with it. I've read many places in this forum, and now jorgemg1984 is also mentioning it, that Kurt's twin is modified. Does anyone know exactly how it's modded?

  7. Gia5
    Member

    "There's nothing I hate more then having to keep the amp level really low and just using the monitor. Its a different playing experience all together."

    Couldn't agree more.

  8. LeonardoB
    Member

    Ok, thanks a lot, all of you really shed a lot of light on this topic.
    I just wanted to precise that I usually don't play in big venues; generally it's about small pubs. I can't really figure out, though, if the extra power and clean room provided by the Twin is worth the effort of moving it around, and if,as Gia5 quoted, it is a pain to play with volume limitations.
    @Gia5 : I thought the DR already overdrived at level 5 of volume! Are you serious, I mean, does it really stay clean until that point?

    I've seen Jonathan Kreisberg using the Deluxe at a gig in the Jazzklubb Fasching, with a gorgeous tone, and Gilad Hekselman has personally recommended it to me over the Twin (via Facebook private message).

    Any other comment?

  9. Gia5
    Member

    Leonardo, mine does, but i must say that i have a "light" touch...
    the effort issue...well, your choice...of course the twin will give you different satisfactions...they're both great amps.
    If finally you'll decide for a heavy amp, take a listen, if you get the chance, to blackface, silverface, princeton, bassman amps too.
    Maybe you'll fall in love with something else than the twin :)

  10. Basile865
    Member

    Theres a local rehearsal studio that has a bunch of amps to use - one of them being a deluxe reverb reissue which was modified with an old EV speaker. That improved the tone greatly from stock in my opinion. Seems to stay tighter in the low end at higher volumes.

    The thing is everybody's style and touch is different, not to mention the output of their pickups vary - all which would make the amps natural overdrive become apparent at different volume levels. I think if you're going to play mostly small pubs go with the deluxe reverb. Most places allow a return policy of 30 days for whatever reason so if you really don't like it return it and get the twin reverb. But I have a good feeling the deluxe will get the job done.

  11. tkosm
    Member

    I had th same problem to decide between these two. I found a "cut " head twin and I combine them with a 2x12 '' cabinet. It is lighter and I still have the sound of the twin. Unfortunately you can't have everything you have to decide which thing to sacrifice.

  12. add4
    Member

    I might be wrong but i think that it is possible to adjust the clean headroom of an amp when you change the tubes. Groove tubes have a rating system on their tubes: tubes are rated 1 to 10, closer to 1 means early distortion and less dynamics, closer to 10 means more clean headroom and more dynamics. I have no idea if it can radically affec the amp headroom or if the deluxe is built to break up early, but you might want to take advices about that.
    more informations :
    http://www.guitaramplifierblueprinting.com/Rating.html

    My personal experience with amps is that even the light ones are HEAVY! and i hate to carry them around. Plus the 10% of 'better' (or different?) tone that you'll have will be lost in the sounds from the drums, bass, sax, and people talking. If i were you, i would not even ask the question and go for the deluxe reverb. the twin is so heavy that it would end up as a practice amp at home.
    Hope that helps

  13. LeonardoB
    Member

    Thanks to you all, I think I've made up my mind: Deluxe Reverb.
    It's lighter, adapt to home practicing (even in a flat, I hope, at low volumes) and it would allow me to get a bit of crunchy taste if I needed it for other musical projects, still offering that great jazz tone that also Jonathan and Gilad do love. Plus, add4's advice on the possibility of adjusting the clean headroom by changing tubes is a great contribute, thanks.

    I know I'll have to fit it with my touch and my guitar's pickups, but I'm quite optimist about it.
    Thanks a lot everyone, again.

  14. Gia5
    Member

    just a p.s: for home practicing, i don't suggest you a valve amp...a transistor, even cheap, amp is better for resistence, and doesn't need maintenance...
    good luck, and keep us posted!!

  15. jorgemg1984
    Member

    and the twin only sounds good really loud which a lot of times is impossible on small clubs.

  16. fakejake
    Member

    Hey! I'm in a similar situation right now, and next to fender I read up on a few smaller companies doing fender clones. You should definetly check out the ones made by Tube Tone http://tube-tone.com/
    They have 3 versions of the Deluxe: One regular, and two modded for larger headroom, with different power section, tubes, speakers etc... They even offer an added mid control, which seems very cool.
    Cheers, jake

  17. jorgemg1984
    Member

    Man if i lived in the US i would buy one of those coles for sure, they much better than stock Fenders (better components, speakers, etc... and lots of options!) The price difference is not huge and its worth it for sure

  18. LeonardoB
    Member

    Hi guys, just wanted to inform the Rosenwinkel crew that I've finally bought the aforementioned Deluxe Reverb, I'm very pleased with it for now, but looking forward to using it in the next gig and see how it reacts.

    Thank you again for your suggestions

  19. fakejake
    Member

    Hey Leonardo,
    how did the Deluxe Reverb turned out? Enough clean headroom to rehearse/ gig with?
    Would you recommend it for rosenwinkelesque modern jazz?
    Cheers, Jake

  20. LeonardoB
    Member

    @Fakejake

    It turned out to really satisfy me. I have to tell you that the guy who sold me the Deluxe had a Twin, too, at his place, and let me give a little try to it. Obviously, it was more "round" and "stout" ; nevertheless, the Deluxe really fits my ideal of sound. I'm running, for now, my Sheraton straight into the amp and it reacts perfectly, not giving the classic smooth and dark jazzy tone, but a more "modern" tone ala Rosenwinkel/Kreisberg (as an answer to your question).
    The clean stays perfectly so until 5 of volume (obviously depending on the PUPs you have, and your attack on the instrument), and the distortion which slightly comes in at that point is pleasant; definitely enough clean headroom/volume, though, to gig in clubs and small venues or rehearse.

    Not to mention the definitely bearable weight (around 19 kilos).

    Ask me if you have any other doubt or you'd like more specific info.

    Regards,
    LeonardoB


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